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prof. dr. G.H. (Geert) Janssen

Vroegmoderne geschiedenis
Faculty of Humanities
Capaciteitsgroep Geschiedenis
Photographer: Jeroen Oerlemans

Visiting address
  • Kloveniersburgwal 48
  • Room number: C 1.11
Postal address
  • Postbus 1610
    1000 BP Amsterdam
Contact details
  • Profile

    Geert Janssen is Professor of Early Modern History. He has a broad interest in European history between 1500-1800, in particular its political and religious cultures, and the history of migration. Much of his work is concerned with the Low Countries, including the Dutch Revolt and the Dutch Golden Age of the 17th century.

    Educated at Groningen (MA) and Leiden (PhD), Geert Janssen subsequently taught early modern history at the universities of Oxford and Cambridge. He held visiting fellowships at the universities of St Andrews and Leuven, and the Institut für Europäische Geschichte in Mainz. In 2013 he was appointed to the chair in early modern history at Amsterdam and served as director of the Amsterdam School of Historical Studies (ASH) from 2014-2016.

    Over the years, he has received support from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (Rubicon, 2005; Veni, 2007; Vici, 2018), the British Academy, the Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst, and Bijzonder Onderzoeksfonds Vlaanderen. He is a recipient of the Gerald Strauss Prize (2015) and the Carla Musterd Teaching Award (2006). Please find more information about current projects and publications, including the NWO VICI programme The Invention of the Refugee in Early Modern Europe, under the tab 'Research'.

    Selected publications

    Journal articles in The Historical Journal, Renaissance Quarterly, Journal of Ecclesiastical History, Sixteenth Century Journal, History, and BMGN-Low Countries Historical Review.

  • Teaching

    From the start I have thoroughly enjoyed working with students who have often inspired me to broaden my range and think in different directions. Among other things, I teach the first year survey course 'Vroegmoderne Geschiedenis' and am keen to supervise students in the field of early modern history as well as in areas related to my research, including the (Counter) Reformation, the history of migration and the Dutch golden age.

    I have recently supervised MA theses on Jewish manuscript production in early modern Amsterdam, Regime change in Haarlem during the Dutch revolt, William of Orange and Balthazar Gerard, News culture and diary-writing practices in 1672, and the Dutch experience in Brazil.

  • Research

    Political history

    As a political historian, I am particularly interested in the 'soft' side of early modern politics: networks, language, ritual and (unwritten) codes of conduct. My Princely Power in the Dutch Republic (2005/2008) focused on patronage practices at the court of the stadholders (provincial governors) in the Dutch Republic. Primarily based on the extensive, yet little known diaries of William Frederick of Nassau (1613-1664) it assessed how clientage shaped political and religious mentalities in the early modern Netherlands. I have also done some work on public display at the Orange court in The Hague (e.g. Funeral processions in the United Provinces).

    Religious history

    Much of my recent work concerns the history of religious change, conflict and identity formation. The Dutch Revolt and Catholic Exile in Reformation Europe (2014) examines the impact of flight, displacement and forced migration on Counter-Reformation culture. By mapping the Catholic diaspora during the Dutch revolt, it seeks to explain how exile worked as a catalyst of religious radicalisation and transformed the world views, networks and identities of early modern refugees. Together with Alexandra Bamji and Mary Laven, I edited the Ashgate Research Companion to the Counter-Reformation (2013).

    Migration history

    I have a broad interest in the cultural history of migration, including early modern exile, humanitarianism and transnational solidarity networks. This is also the topic of my current research project (see NWO VICI programme below). My inaugural lecture, Nieuw Amsterdam (2014) examined the ways in which immigrants and emigrants shaped notions of 'Dutchness' in the early modern period and facilitated their spreading across the globe.

    NWO VICI Project The Invention of the Refugee in Early Modern Europe

    Refugees have been common throughout history, but are for the first time described as such in the early modern period (1450-1750). Integrating historical, legal and social scientific approaches to migration, this project aims to analyse the invention of the refugee in early modern Europe. More specifically, it seeks to achieve three inter-related objectives:

    1. To explain the emergence of the refugee as a social category in European society. It will map when, where and why particular migrants started to describe themselves as 'refugees' and trace the models (religious, political, legal) of such discursive strategies
    2. To identify the agency of displaced religious minorities in forging transnational solidarity networks. By studying how diasporic communities organized themselves, this project reveals the significance of refugees in shaping media coverage, initiating humanitarian interventions and promoting a new emotional culture that focused on empathy
    3. To uncover the impact of refugees on European state formation. This project will examine how the protection and accommodation of displaced men and women interacted with the ambitions of early modern authorities to expand their territories and forge confessional regimes

    The project consists of three PhD positions and a Postdoc. Funded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), it will run from 2018-2023.

    Main publications

    Books

    Articles

    The Cambridge Companion to the Dutch Golden Age (CUP, 2018)

    The Dutch Revolt and Catholic Exile in Reformation Europe (CUP, 2014)

    The Ashgate Research Companion to the Counter-Reformation (Ashgate, 2013)

    Princely Power in the Dutch Republic. Patronage and William Frederick of Nassau (MUP, 2008)

    Creaturen van de macht. Patronage bij Willem Frederik van Nassau (AUP, 2005)

    Het stokje van Oldenbarnevelt (Verloren, 2001)

  • Outreach

    Museums and heritage institutions

    I enjoy disseminating my research to a wider public and am keen to collaborate with museums and heritage institutions. I have done some advisory work for, amongst others, the Amsterdam Museum (new collections display 2017), Rijksmuseum (Maurits. Prins van Oranje 2000; Gerard ter Borch en de Vrede van Munster 1999; 80 jaar oorlog 2018; RijksApp 2018), Fries Museum (De Friese Nassaus 2003), Oude Kerk Amsterdam (Kalkar kerkschatten 2018).

    Popular media

  • Publications

    2018

    • Helmers, H. J., & Janssen, G. H. (2018). Introduction: Understanding the Dutch Golden Age. In H. J. Helmers, & G. H. Janssen (Eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Dutch Golden Age (pp. 1-12). (Cambridge Companions to Culture). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI: 10.1017/9781316771549.004
    • Helmers, H. J., & Janssen, G. H. (Eds.) (2018). The Cambridge Companion to the Dutch Golden Age. (Cambridge Companions to Culture). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI: 10.1017/9781316771549 [details]
    • Janssen, G. H. (2018). Migration. In H. J. Helmers, & G. H. Janssen (Eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Dutch Golden Age (pp. 49-66). (Cambridge Companions to Culture). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI: 10.1017/9781316771549.007
    • Janssen, G. H., & Helmers, H. J. (2018). Epilogue: The Legacy of the Dutch Golden Age. In H. J. Helmers, & G. H. Janssen (Eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Dutch Golden Age (pp. 390-399). (Cambridge Companions to Culture). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI: 10.1017/9781316771549.024

    2017

    • Janssen, G. H. (2017). The Republic of the Refugees: Early Modern Migrations and the Dutch Experience. Historical Journal, 60(1), 233-252. DOI: 10.1017/S0018246X1600039X [details]

    2014

    2013

    • Janssen, G. H. (2013). The Exile Experience. In A. Bamji, G. H. Janssen, & M. Laven (Eds.), The Ashgate research companion to the Counter-Reformation (pp. 73-90). (Ashgate research companion). Farnham: Ashgate. [details]

    2012

    • Janssen, G. H. (2012). The Counter-Reformation of the Refugee. Exile and the Shaping of Catholic Militancy in the Dutch Revolt. The Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 63, 671-692.

    2011

    • Janssen, G. H. (2011). Quo Vadis? Catholic Perceptions of Flight and the Revolt of the Low Countries, 1566-1609. Renaissance Quarterly, 64, 472-499.

    2010

    • Janssen, G. H. (2010). The Dutchness of the Dutch Golden Age. Historical Journal, 53, 805-817.

    2009

    • Janssen, G. H. (2009). Exiles and the Politics of Reintegration in the Dutch Revolt. History, 94, 36-52.
    • Janssen, G. H. (2009). Political Ambiguity and Confessional Diversity in the Funeral Processions of Stadholders in the Dutch Republic. The Sixteenth Century Journal, 40, 283-301.

    2008

    • Janssen, G. H. (2008). Princely Power in the Dutch Republic. Patronage and William Frederick of Nassau (1613-64). Manchester: Manchester University Press.

    2007

    • Janssen, G. H. (2007). Dynastieke transfer in de Republiek. De politieke en religieuze betekenis van de stadhouderlijke begrafenisstoet. BMGN - Low Countries Historical Review, 122, 208-232.

    2006

    • Janssen, G. H. (2006). Political Brokerage in the Dutch Republic: The Patronage Networks of William Frederick of Nassau (1613-64). In M. Keblusek, H. Cools, & B. Noldus (Eds.), Your Humble Servant: Agents in Early Modern Europe (pp. 65-80). Hilversum: Verloren.

    2005

    • Janssen, G. H. (2005). Creaturen van de macht. Patronage bij Willem Frederik van Nassau (1613-1664). Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press.
    • Janssen, G. H. (2005). Dutch Clientelism and News Networks in Public and Private Spheres. The Case of Stadholder William Frederick. In J. Koopmans (Ed.), News and Politics in Early Modern Europe (1500-1800) (pp. 151-165). Leuven: Peeters.
    • Janssen, G. H. (2005). Patronage en corruptie. Publieke en private rollen van een stadhouder in de Republiek. Tijdschrift voor Sociale en Economische Geschiedenis, 2, 47-67.

    2004

    • Janssen, G. H. (2004). Leven als een graaf. Het hof van Willem Frederik (1613-1664) als particuliere onderneming. Zeventiende Eeuw, 20, 15-26.

    2013

    • Bamji, A., Janssen, G. H., & Laven, M. (2013). The Ashgate research companion to the Counter-Reformation. (Ashgate research companion). Farnham: Ashgate. [details]

    2011

    • Janssen, G. H. (2011). 500 jaar Nederlands-Engelse relaties. In J. Schokkenbroek, & I. Jacobs (Eds.), Nederland-Engeland. Reflecties over zee (pp. 9-16). Zutphen: Walburg Pers.

    2006

    • Janssen, G. H. (2006). De stoet van de stadhouder. Over de politieke boodschap van funeraire symboliek. In M. Ebben, & P. Wagenaar (Eds.), De cirkel doorbroken. Met nieuwe ideeën terug naar de bronnen. Opstellen over de Republiek (pp. 15-27). Leiden: Leidse Historische Studies.
    • Janssen, G. H. (2006). Le reti di patronage di Guglielmo Federico di Nassau-Dietz (1613-1664). Quaderni Storici, 122, 413-432.

    2004

    • Janssen, G. H. (2004). Albertine Agnes. In E. Kloek (Ed.), Digitaal Vrouwenlexicon Nederland Den Haag.

    2003

    • Janssen, G. H. (2003). Het stadhouderschap van Willem Frederik in de Noordelijke gewesten. In S. Groenveld, Y. Kuiper, & J. J. Huizinga (Eds.), Nassau uit de schaduw van Oranje (pp. 45-55). Franeker: Van wijnen.

    2001

    • Janssen, G. H. (2001). De kunst van het kopiëren. Opdrachten van stadhouder Willem Frederik van Nassau aan Pieter Nason. Jaarboek - Oranje-Nassau Museum, 36-47.

    2000

    • Janssen, G. H. (2000). Catalogus. In K. Zandvliet (Ed.), Maurits. Prins van Oranje (pp. 385-403, 412-414, 424-426, 429-434). Amsterdam: Waanders / Rijksmuseum.
    • Janssen, G. H. (2000). De aanslag op Amsterdam van 1650. Het perspectief van de patronage van Willem II. Amstelodamum, 87, 65-75.

    2017

    • Janssen, G. H. (2017). [Review of: T. Ó hAnnracháin (2015) Catholic Europe, 1592-1648]. Church History and Religious Culture, 97(1), 134-135. DOI: 10.1163/18712428-09701019 [details]

    2016

    • Janssen, G. H. (2016). [Review of: D. van der Linden (2015) Experiencing Exile: huguenot refugees in the Dutch republic, 1680-1700]. The Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 67(1), 206-206. DOI: 10.1017/S0022046915002481 [details]
    • Janssen, G. H. (2016). [Review of: N. Terpstra (2015) Religious Refugees in the Early Modern World : an alternative history of the Reformation]. Journal of Early Modern History, 20(6), 585-586. DOI: 10.1163/15700658-00200006-02

    2015

    • Janssen, G. H. (2015). Nieuw Amsterdam. (Oratiereeks). Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press. [details]
    • Janssen, G. H. (2015). [Review of: B. Forclaz (2014) Catholiques au défi de la Réforme: La coexistence confessionnelle à Utrecht au XVIIe siècle]. American Historical review, 120(5), 1987-1988. DOI: 10.1093/ahr/120.5.1987 [details]
    • Janssen, G. H. (2015). [Review of: H. Dunthorne (2013) Britain and the Dutch Revolt, 1560-1700]. The Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 66(1), 200. DOI: 10.1017/S002204691400147X [details]
    • Janssen, G. H. (2015). [Review of: M.C. Erler (2013) Reading and Writing during the Dissolution: Monks. Friars, and Nuns 1530-1558]. The Sixteenth Century Journal, 46(3), 724-725. [details]

    2014

    • Janssen, G. H. (2014). [Review of: T.G. Fehler, G.G. Kroeker (2014) Religious Diaspora in Early Modern Europe: Stratagies of Exile]. Renaissance Quarterly, 67(4), 1389-1390. DOI: 10.1086/679841 [details]

    2013

    • Janssen, G. H. (2013). [Review of: L. Duerloo (2012) Dynasty and Piety: Archduke Albert (1598-1621) and Habsburg Political Culture in an Age of Religious Wars]. The Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 64(3), 640-641. DOI: 10.1017/S0022046913000122 [details]

    2012

    • Janssen, G. H. (2012). Review of: B. Boute, Academic interests and confessionalisation. The Sixteenth Century Journal, 43, 514-515.
    • Janssen, G. H. (2012). Review of: J. Spohnholz, The tactics of toleration. The Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 63, 409-410.
    • Janssen, G. H. (2012). Review of: M. Pitassi, Les modes de la conversion confessionelle. The Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 63, 407-408.
    • Janssen, G. H. (2012). Review of: R. Stein, Networks, regions and nations; B. Kaplan, Boundaries and their meanings in the history of the Netherlands. The Sixteenth Century Journal, 43, 515-517.

    2011

    • Janssen, G. H. (2011). Review of: A. Duke, Dissident identities in the early modern Low Countries. English Historical Review, 126, 936-937.
    • Janssen, G. H. (2011). Review of: T. Johnson, Magistrates, madonnas and miracles. The Sixteenth Century Journal, 42, 472-473.

    2009

    • Janssen, G. H. (2009). Review of: B. Kaplan, Divided by faith. English Historical Review, 124, 701-703.
    • Janssen, G. H. (2009). Review of: N. Mout, Plakkaat van verlatinge. BMGN - Low Countries Historical Review, 124.
    • Janssen, G. H. (2009). Review of: P. Arnade, Beggars, iconoclasts, and civic patriots. Journal of Early Modern History, 13, 96-98.

    2008

    • Janssen, G. H. (2008). Review of: A. Dunan-Page, The religious culture of the Huguenots. The Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 59, 158-159.
    • Janssen, G. H. (2008). Review of: C. Trompetter, Leven aan de rand van de Republiek. BMGN - Low Countries Historical Review, 123.
    • Janssen, G. H. (2008). Review of: D. Kok, Diarium Furmerii. BMGN - Low Countries Historical Review, 123.
    • Janssen, G. H. (2008). Review of: I. Thoen, Strategic Affection? BMGN - Low Countries Historical Review, 123, 251–254.
    This list of publications is extracted from the UvA-Current Research Information System. Questions? Ask the library or the Pure staff of your faculty / institute. Log in to Pure to edit your publications. Log in to Personal Page Publication Selection tool to manage the visibility of your publications on this list.
  • Ancillary activities
    • No ancillary activities